Huguenot

Huguenot

Huguenot - perfect generosity Serge Beureux perpetuates a long legacy of style. Rigorously authentic. 2010, the 400th anniversary of King Henry IV (1553-1610). A lively king, with sincere and generous ideas for his time, he was recognised for his values of tolerance and practical curiosity. Within his court he surrounded himself with talented and deeply honest craftsmen who were inspired in their quest to go one step further towards perfection, and thus generated deep bonds of friendship through professional guilds. Virtous circles and the court of France During the time before the centralised manufacture of watches at a single industrial site, these exquisite time-keepers were assembled by being passed from the hand of one expert to another. Each individual brought his own skill and expertise, thus adding value. The style of production represented by the Huguenot brand is one that perpetuates a highly personalised form of manufacture – meshing a web of individual talents in the most carefully crafted composants. A precious web of talent that can be compared with the talent of the king’s craftsmen who made the French court shine with their genius. Serge Beureux is an independent entrepreneur armed with extensive experience accumulated at the heart of a large company. He is filled with an energy and a will strong enough to move mountains, and has paid homage to this particular chapter of cultural history by creating a fashionable and respectable watch-making business, built on the philosophy of ‘’I am’’ rather than ‘’I seem’’. The designer Eddy Burger understood how to capture and restore these values of the individual: straight, uncomplicated lines, imbued with a classic elegance, set these time-pieces apart and ensure their clarity and finesse. Excellence transplanted to new grounds At the beginning of the sixteenth century Geneva tripled its population by opening its borders to those persecuted liberal minded souls chased out of France. In so doing, Geneva inherited exeptional know-how. These travellers, who had often lost everything in their flight, brought their erudition and their skills to the service of their host country. They thus developed a universal standard: what is most beautiful and rafined can be found inside – the outside is just what remains. The essence is rigourousness and perfection. Even today, Geneva and the Swiss watch-making industry more generally, are both embued with the traces of these souls inspired by liberty, faithful to their ideals.